CBSE News > Vocational Training Courses in India

Vocational Training Courses in India

National Vocational Education Qualification Framework

Student may choose academics or a vocation in Class VIII, get CBSE vocational degree after class XII and be absorbed by industry

Union Minister for Human Resource Development and Telecom Kapil Sibal said today that by next year the National Vocational Education Qualification Framework would be developed that would enable students to select between a vocational and an academic degree. Sibal was in the city to address a gathering of Rotarians at DISCON 2010, the annual district conference of Rotary International district 3080.

“The vocational education framework would enable a student to choose academics or a vocation as early as in Class VIII. The student would get a CBSE vocational degree after class XII enabling them to be absorbed by the industry. There are jobs but no human resources. There are no trained paramedics, lab assistants, chefs, drivers, refrigeration engineers, automobile engineers, etc that the industry requires,” said Sibal.

Sibal said that the wealth of the nation is not its GDP but the intellectual property created in the Universities. “There are 220 million children who go to school in India. This is two-thirds of the population of USA. Of these only around 12 per cent students reach university. A large part of the 18-24 years age group has never been able to reach college. The challenge to the community is enormous,” he said.

Sibal further said that for this large section there are no avenues for employment. Even if efforts are made to ensure that more students get higher education, not every one wants to be a doctor or an engineer. This section may still not want to study conventional courses and enter college. In order to cater to this group, which could be around 50 to 60 million, a National Vocational Education Qualification Framework on lines of Australia is being developed.

Further the vocational courses would be taken to the level of polytechnics or universities. Sibal said that there was a need to reduce the rate of drop-outs and emphasise on education of girls.

“There have to be new ways of teaching children. The equation between teachers and students is changing. The rote learning system has to be changed. There is a need to move away from textbook learning. Education is a continuous upgradation of skills. Through the implementation of Right to Education Act, we would aim to increase the number of students in schools substantially,” he said.

Related: Vocational Training in India